Plato pp 1-5 | Cite as

Introduction

  • Gregory Vlastos
Part of the Modern Studies in Philosophy book series

Abstract

The last three decades have witnessed a renaissance of interest in Plato among philosophers throughout the world. This interest is still growing. Plato is being studied and argued over with greater vigor than ever before. The philosophical and even the classical journals of English-speaking countries have reflected this development. More articles and discussions of Plato have appeared in them than of any other of the great thinkers of the past. And the number of books and commentaries on Plato is also impressive, as one can see by glancing at the bibliographies at the back of each of the two volumes in this anthology.

Keywords

Abate Hate 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Notes

  1. 2.
    Bertrand Russell, Principles of Mathematics (London, 1903), Chapter X, “The Contradiction.”Google Scholar
  2. For a succinct recent discussion see the article on the Logical Paradoxes by J. van Heijenoort in the Encyclopedia of Philosophy (New York, 1967).Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Cf. G. Vlastos, “The Third Man Argument in the Parmenides,” Philosophical Review 63 (1954), 319–49 at 337–38; “Self-predication in Plato’s Later Dialogues,” Philosophical Review 78 (1969), 74–78.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Gregory Vlastos 1971

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gregory Vlastos
    • 1
  1. 1.PrincetonUSA

Personalised recommendations