Advertisement

Prophets and Sceptics

  • Christopher Harvie
  • Graham Martin
  • Aaron Scharf

Abstract

The most remarkable feature of the nineteenth-century writers who praised and defended the mores of industrial society is their insignificance today. We know the age through its critics — Carlyle, Ruskin, Morris — not through its enthusiasts: who now reads Andrew Ure, Harriet Martineau or Herbert Spencer? The critics probably survive to a great extent because they combined their social criticism with intellectual and artistic criticism, and mounted their attack in the language of a traditional and continuing culture. The enthusiasts adopted the language of economics and the infant ‘social sciences’, disciplines which have changed so radically since their time that to rediscover the thread of their argument is to nave to embark on a taxing exploration of archaic economic and social philosophy.

Keywords

Social Philosophy Liberal Party Revolutionary Movement Distinct Operation Popular Election 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Further Reading

  1. S. G. Checkland, ‘The Rise of Industrial Society in England’, chap. 10.Google Scholar
  2. Asa Briggs, ‘The Age of Improvement’, chap. 9.4.Google Scholar
  3. Raymond Williams, ‘Culture and Society’, chaps. 4, 6, 7.Google Scholar
  4. Noel Annan, ‘Leslie Stephen’, 1951.Google Scholar
  5. Asa Briggs, ‘The Age of Improvement’, chap. 9.5.Google Scholar
  6. J. W. Burrow, ‘Evolution and Society’, 1966.Google Scholar
  7. G. N. A. Vesey (ed.), ‘Body and Mind’, 1964, chaps. 11, 14, 15, 16, 17, 20.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Open University 1970

Authors and Affiliations

  • Christopher Harvie
    • 1
  • Graham Martin
    • 1
  • Aaron Scharf
    • 1
  1. 1.the Open UniversityUK

Personalised recommendations