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Irish Apprenticeship 1790–1801

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Abstract

No part of Castlereagh’s career has evoked more hostility than that concerned with Ireland. In the gallery reserved for the oppressors of that country, Castlereagh occupies a special place.1 Others might have been guilty of greater acts of cruelty or oppression, but Castlereagh had been born in Ireland, had, in his youth, shown great fervour for his country’s rights, and had, finally, deserted his former professions to serve as the main agent of the British government in the Union of the kingdoms in 1800. Castlereagh himself had no illusions as to the feelings of many Irishmen concerning him.

Keywords

French Revolution British Government Irish Government British Empire Parliamentary Seat 
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Notes

  1. 1.
    R. McDowell, ‘The Irish Executive in the Nineteenth Century’, Irish Historical Studies, ix. 265–6. A. and E. Porritt, The Unreformed House of Commons (1909), ii. 470–1. Johnston, Great Britain and Ireland, pp. 34–44.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    M. MacDonagh, The Viceroy’s Postbag (1904), pp. 42–53, 67.Google Scholar
  3. 1.
    T. D. Ingram, A History of the Legislative Union of Great Britain and Ireland (1887), p. 105.Google Scholar
  4. 1.
    Castlereagh declared that the safety of the state was dependent on the support of the ‘great mass of its proprietors’, C.C. iv. 392–400. See also V. Harlow, The Founding of the 2nd British Empire (1952–64), ii. 631–9.Google Scholar
  5. 1.
    E. Strauss, Irish Nationalism and British Democracy (1951), p. 64.Google Scholar
  6. 2.
    See also E. R. R. Green, The Industrial Archaeology of Co. Down (1963), p. 67.Google Scholar
  7. 1.
    S. C. Hall, Ireland: its scenery and character (1844).Google Scholar
  8. J. Stevenson, Two Centuries of Life in Down (1920), pp. 241–4.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© C. J. Bertlett 1966

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