Is Divine Existence Credible?

  • A. J. D. Porteous
  • R. D. Maclennan
  • G. E. Davie

Abstract

IN residing, some years ago, at an American State University, one of the things that most impressed me was the prevalence, alike among the students and among members of the Staff, of the view that belief in God is no longer possible for any really enlightened mind. This point of view was naively militant in the student-body; among members of the Staff, with comparatively rare exceptions, it seemed to be assumed as a matter of course. That such a way of thinking should be thus widespread in America is not, indeed, surprising. It owes much of its strength to the yet wider currency of the Fundamentalist counter-position; each creates a field highly favourable to the other. This sceptical way of thinking finds, however, notable representatives in every university and in every age; and in our European universities—at least until the past decade—there has probably been more of it than there has ever been at any time in the past. You may recall the passage in the Encyclical Letter of the Archbishops and Bishops in session at the Lambeth Conference: ‘We are aware of the extent to which the very thought of God seems to be passing away from the minds and hearts of many even in nominally Christian nations.’

Keywords

Vortex Europe Steam Assure Dition 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    A. E. Taylor, The Faith of a Moralist (Macmillan, 1930), i, p. 66; p. 320.Google Scholar
  2. 1.
    Aldous Huxley, Do What You Will (Chatto & Windus, 1929), p. 116.Google Scholar
  3. 1.
    Quoted by R. R. Marett, The Threshold of Religion (Methuen, 1909), p. 12.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Janet Ludlam 1967

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. D. Porteous
  • R. D. Maclennan
  • G. E. Davie

There are no affiliations available

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