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The UK population: past, present and future

  • Julie Jefferies
Part of the Focus On book series (FO)

Abstract

The United Kingdom consists of England, Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland. In 2004, it was home to over 59.8 million people.1

Keywords

National Statistics Research Agency Demographic Transition Natural Increase Labour Force Survey 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

  1. 1.
    Population estimates for England and Wales are produced by the Office for National Statistics: www.statistics.gov.uk/statbase/Product.asp?vlnk=601&More=N
  2. Population estimates for Scotland are produced by the General Register Office for Scotland (GROS): www.groscotland.gov.uk
  3. Population estimates for Northern Ireland are produced by the Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency (NISRA): www.nisra.gov.uk/index.asp
  4. 2.
    Houston R A (1996) The Population History of Britain and Ireland 1500–1750, in Anderson M (1996) British Population History from the Black Death to the present day, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.Google Scholar
  5. 3.
    For example, Hatcher J (1996) Plague, population and the English economy, 1348–1530, in Anderson M (1996) British Population History from the Black Death to the present day, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.Google Scholar
  6. Hinde A (2003) England’s Population: A History since the Domesday Survey, Hodder Arnold: London.Google Scholar
  7. 4.
    British Broadcasting Corporation: www.bbc.co.uk/history/state/nations/four_nations_01.shtml
  8. 5.
    Hinde A (2003) England’s Population: A History since the Domesday Survey, Hodder Arnold: London.Google Scholar
  9. 6.
    See reference 5.Google Scholar
  10. 7.
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  11. 8.
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  12. 9.
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  14. 10.
    See reference 9 and Houston R A (1996) The Population History of Britain and Ireland 1500–1750, in Anderson M (1996)British Population History from the Black Death to the present day, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.Google Scholar
  15. 11.
    Coleman D and Salt J (1992) The British Population: Patterns, Trends and Processes, Oxford University Press: Oxford.Google Scholar
  16. 12.
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    See reference 11 and Houston R A (1996) The Population History of Britain and Ireland 1500–1750, in Anderson M (1996) British Population History from the Black Death to the present day, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.Google Scholar
  18. 14.
    Houston R A (1996) The Population History of Britain and Ireland 1500–1750, in Anderson M (1996) British Population History from the Black Death to the present day, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.Google Scholar
  19. 15.
    See reference 14.Google Scholar
  20. 16.
    Office for National Statistics (2001) 200 Years of the Census. On Census Bicentenary web pages: www.statistics.gov.uk/census2001/bicentenary/bicentenary.htmlGoogle Scholar
  21. 17.
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  22. 18.
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  23. 19.
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  24. 20.
    Office for National Statistics 2001 Census pages: www.statistics.gov.uk/census2001/cb_8asp
  25. 21.
    Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency: www.nisra.gov.uk/census/censushistory/censusireland.html
  26. 22.
    Central Statistics Office Ireland (2004) Irish Statistical Yearbook 2004, Chapter 1 and Northern Ireland Appendix: www.cso.ie/releasespublications/statisticaLyearbook_ireland_2004.htmGoogle Scholar
  27. 23.
    See reference 22. In Northern Ireland, censuses were taken in 1926, 1937, 1951, 1961, 1966, 1971, 1981, 1991 and 2001. In the Republic of Ireland, censuses were taken in 1926, 1936, 1946, 1951 and then every five years (with the exception of 1979 instead of 1976 and 2002 instead of 2001, due to foot and mouth disease).Google Scholar
  28. 24.
    The demographic transition model was initially proposed by Warren Thompson in 1929 and has since been documented and modified by Frank Notestein and others.Google Scholar
  29. 25.
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  31. 26.
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  32. 27.
    See references 11 and 25.Google Scholar
  33. 28.
    Woods R I and Smith C W (1983) The decline of marital fertility in the late 19th century: the case of England and Wales. Population Studies 37, 207–226.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. 29.
    See reference 11.Google Scholar
  35. 30.
    Baines D (1985) Migration in a Mature Economy: Emigration and Internal Migration in England and Wales, 1861–1900, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge,Google Scholar
  36. cited in Hinde A (2003) England’s Population: A History since the Domesday Survey, Hodder Arnold: London.Google Scholar
  37. 31.
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  38. 32.
    Griffiths C and Brock A (2003) Twentieth Century Mortality Trends in England and Wales. Health Statistics Quarterly 18, 5–17.Google Scholar
  39. 33.
    Baines D (1985) Migration in a Mature Economy: Emigration and Internal Migration in England and Wales, 1861–1900, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge,Google Scholar
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  41. 34.
    Anderson M (1996) Population Change in North-western Europe, 1750–1850, in Anderson M (1996) British Population History from the Black Death to the present day, Cambridge University Press: Cambridge.Google Scholar
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    See reference 34.Google Scholar
  43. 36.
    See reference 34.Google Scholar
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  45. 39.
    See reference 11. Plus Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency and General Register Office for Scotland (for data on births and divorces).Google Scholar
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  47. 40.
    All population estimates from 1951 onwards refer to mid-year estimates (population as at 30 June).Google Scholar
  48. 41.
    Figure refers to the calendar year 1976.Google Scholar
  49. 42.
    ‘Net migration’ in this context refers to ‘net civilian migration and other changes’. ‘Other changes’ refers to changes in the numbers of armed forces resident in the UK plus any adjustments made to reconcile differences between estimated population change and the figures for natural change and net civilian migration.Google Scholar
  50. 43.
    See note 42.Google Scholar
  51. 44.
    See Office for National Statistics National Health Service Central Register (NHSCR) inter-regional migration movements data: www.statistics.gov.uk/STATBASE/Product.asp?vlnk=10191
  52. 45.
    See note 42.Google Scholar
  53. 46.
    General Register Office for Scotland: www.gro-scotland.gov.ukGoogle Scholar
  54. 47.
    Office for National Statistics (2005) Birth Statistics 2004. Series FM1 No.33. www.statistics.gov.uk/StatBase/Product.asp?vlnk=5768&Pos=1&ColRank=1&Rank=272Google Scholar
  55. 48.
    Office for National Statistics (2004) Focus on Gender: www.statistics.gov.uk/focuson/gender/Google Scholar
  56. 49.
    Office for National Statistics UK interactive population pyramid: www.statistics.gov.uk/populationestimates/svg_pyramid/default.htm
  57. 2001.
    Census data from Office for National Statistics, General Register Office for Scotland and Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency.Google Scholar
  58. 51.
    Labour Force Survey data — Office for National Statistics.Google Scholar
  59. 1961.
    and 1981 estimates are Census data from the Office for National Statistics, General Register Office for Scotland, Northern Ireland Statistics and Research Agency. 2004 estimate is from the Labour Force Survey.Google Scholar
  60. 1961.
    average household size is from Census data. 2004 average household size is from the Labour Force Survey.Google Scholar
  61. 1961.
    and 1981 percentages are from Census data. 2004 estimates for household and family types are from the Labour Force Survey.Google Scholar
  62. 55.
    Office for National Statistics (2004) Focus on Families: www.statistics.gov.uk/focuson/families/Google Scholar
  63. 56.
    In this context, ethnic minority groups include those of Mixed, Asian (or Asian British/Scottish), Black (or Black British/Scottish), Chinese and other non-White ethnic origins.Google Scholar
  64. 57.
    Office for National Statistics (2004) Focus on Ethnicity: www.statistics.gov.uk/focuson/ethnicity/
  65. 58.
    For information on UK population projections, see Government Actuary’s Department website: www.gad.gov.uk/
  66. 59.
    Responsibility for the production of national population projections is due to be transferred from the Government Actuary’s Department to the Office for National Statistics in 2006.Google Scholar
  67. 60.
    Figures refer to the 2004-based projections: principal projection.Google Scholar
  68. 61.
    See note on Migration and population growth at www.gad.gov.uk/population/2003/methodology/mignote.htm

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© Crown copyright 2005

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  • Julie Jefferies

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