The Bulgarian Gypsies (Roma) during World War II

  • Elena Marushiakova
  • Vesselin Popov
Chapter

Abstract

Gypsies have been living in the land of Bulgaria for centuries. The surrounding population refers to them with the generic name Tsigani and perceives them as one whole undifferentiated community. It is true that all Gypsies in Bulgaria belong to the Roma stream and that Roma is also their common self-appellation; however, they are internally divided into various groups, subgroups and metagroup units and they entered Bulgaria gradually with several waves of migration.

Keywords

Sugar Migration Europe Amid Trench 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    E. Marushiakova and V. Popov, Gypsies (Roma) in Bulgaria (Frankfurt am Main: Peter Lang Verlag, 1997), pp.15–33.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Zh. Chankov, Naselenieto na Bulgaria [The Population of Bulgaria] (Sofia: Kazanlashka dolina, 1935), pp.54–56.Google Scholar
  3. 7.
    Office of Strategic Services, ‘Population Development of Bulgaria’ in Fifty Years Ago. Revolt Amid the Darkness. Days of Remembrance April 18–25, 1993 (Washington: U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, 1995), p.263.Google Scholar
  4. 23.
    E. Marushiakova and V. Popov (eds.), Studii Romani, vol. I (Sofia: Club ‘90, 1994), p.61.Google Scholar
  5. 26.
    S. Tabakov, Opit za istoria na grad Sliven [An Attempt for History of the Town of Sliven], Tom I (Sofia, 1911), pp.125–127.Google Scholar
  6. 27.
    D. Genov, T. Tairov and V. Marinov, Tsiganskoto naselenk v Bulgaria po patia na socialisma [The Gypsy Population in Bulgaria on the Way of Socialism] (Sofia: Otechestven Front, 1968), pp.26–27.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Elena Marushiakova
  • Vesselin Popov

There are no affiliations available

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