Advertisement

Tourism and Cold Water Islands in the North Atlantic

  • Thomas G. Baum
  • Laura Hagen-Grant
  • Lee Jolliffe
  • Sheldon Lambert
  • Bjorn Sigurjonsson

Abstract

When we think about islands, in the tourism context, invariably the images that come to mind are those of sun-drenched, white-sanded, palm-fringed paradises. There are, however, alternatives — destinations which are much more on the periphery of mainstream tourism but for which tourism has been, is or is planned to be, an important component within their profiles of economic activity. Such cold water islands do not have the intrinsic climatic advantages of sun destinations but, none the less, attract visitors for very different reasons — the natural environment, outward bound activity, culture and heritage, to name but a few. Iceland, the Shetlands, the Hebrides, and the Falklands are examples of locations which are seeking to attract visitors without the advantages which sun islands have at their disposal. Other such islands, generally rather closer to main centres of population, developed in popularity relatively early in the growth of modern tourism and, in some cases, have suffered relative decline in the face of competition from warmer alternatives. The Isle of Man, the Channel Islands, and the Baltic islands of Bornholm, Gotland and the Ålands are examples of cold water islands which experienced their tourism heydays between ten and fifty years ago and have been struggling to adjust and re-focus their tourism offering in the light of changing market demands since that time.

Keywords

Small Island Tourism Development Tourism Sector Island Community Tourism Business 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Bartmann, B. and T. Baum, ‘Boutiques or Bazaars. Cultural Tourism as a Niche Strategy in Small Jurisdictions’, proceedings International Conference on Cultural Heritage in Islands and Small States (Malta: University of Malta, 1997).Google Scholar
  2. Baum, T., ‘The Fascination of Islands: A Tourist Perspective’, in D. G. Lockhart and D. Drakakis-Smith (eds). Island Tourism: Problems & Perspectives, (London: Mansell, 1997) pp. 21–35.Google Scholar
  3. Butler, R. W. ‘Tourism Development in small islands: past influences and future directions’, in D. G. Lockhart, D. Drakakis-Smith and J. A. Schembri (eds), The Development Process in Small Island States (London: Routledge, 1993) pp. 71–91.Google Scholar
  4. Hagen, L., Seasonality in Tourism (Charlottetown, PEI: Institute of Island Studies, 1997).Google Scholar
  5. Hagen, L. and T. Baum, ‘Responses to Seasonality: the Experience of Peripheral Destinations’, proceedings, International Tourism Research Conference on Peripheral Area Tourism (Bornholm, Denmark, 1997).Google Scholar
  6. Lambert, S., Sustainable Practice for Marine Tourism Operators (Charlottetown, PEI: Institute of Island Studies, 1997).Google Scholar
  7. Lockhart, D., ‘Islands and Tourism: an overview’, in D. G. Lockhart and D. Drakakis-Smith (eds), Island Tourism: Problems & Perspectives (London: Mansell, 1997) pp. 3–20.Google Scholar
  8. Sigurjonsson, B., Tourism Administration and the Periphery: the case of Iceland, Newfoundland and Scotland, unpublished MPhil thesis (University of Strathclyde, 2000).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Godfrey Baldacchino and David Milne 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas G. Baum
  • Laura Hagen-Grant
  • Lee Jolliffe
  • Sheldon Lambert
  • Bjorn Sigurjonsson

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations