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From the Marshall Plan to EEC: Direct and Indirect Influences

  • Michelle Cini
Part of the Europe in Transition: The NYU European Studies Series book series (EIT)

Abstract

The casual relationship between the initiation of the Marshall Plan and the establishment of the European Economic Community (EEC) is often taken for granted. The assumption is that the institutionalization of the Organisation for European Economic Recovery (OEEC) forces the West Europeans to cooperate in a manner they would not otherwise have chosen, and that this provided the foundation upon which the European integration process was constructed. In exploring this assumption, the chapter unpacks the relationship between the Marshall Plan and the EEC to focus on some of the more indirect influences: namely, the role of the Plan in altering Allied perceptions towards Germany, and the part it played in inspiring among West European elites a sense of optimism and self-confidence with regard to the reconstruction not only of Western Europe’s economy, but also of its political systems.

Keywords

European Integration Custom Union European Economic Community American Line Marshall Plan 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Martin Schain 2001

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michelle Cini

There are no affiliations available

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