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Drug Abuse in Post-Communist Russia

  • John M. Kramer
Chapter
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Abstract

Suggesting that nonalcoholic drug abuse can eliminate the Russian nation “in the very near future” is undoubtedly hyperbolic, but the available data on the evolving status of this pathology in the Russian Federation are indeed worrisome. Thus, the findings from one of the most comprehensive surveys to date, conducted in 1992, on drug abuse among residents of urban centers in Russia, reportedly “exceeded all expectations,” with 11.5 percent of the respondents (and 23 percent of them in Moscow) admitting that they had consumed unspecified illicit “narcotics” at least once, whereas researchers had hypothesized that the respective figure would be between 2 and 3 percent.1 Overall, this survey concludes that a “fundamentally new narco-situation” has emerged in Russia.2

Keywords

Human Immunodeficiency Virus Drug Abuse Illicit Drug Organize Crime Acquire Immune Deficiency Syndrome 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 8.
    For information on this subject, see Mary Schaeffer Conroy, “Abuse of Drugs Other than Alcohol and Tobacco in the Soviet Union,” Soviet Studies (July 1990): 447–480.Google Scholar
  2. 16.
    The estimate of approximately 11 million drug addicts in the RF is made in Aleksandr Kolesnikov, “Narkomaniia v Rossii: Sostoianie, tendentsii, puti preodoleniia,” Informatsionnyi shornik “Bezopasnost,” no.11–12 (December 1998): 8. The estimate of between 10 and 15 million illicit users is in Literaturnaia gazeta, 5 November 1997.Google Scholar
  3. 28.
    U.S. Department of State, Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, 1997 (Washington, D.C.: 1998). Estimates on drug prices in Moscow from the Ministry of the Interior reported in Moscow News, 4–10 February 1999.Google Scholar
  4. 37.
    For a detailed analysis of the status of drug abuse in the USSR and the responses of the Soviet regime to it, see John M. Kramer, “Drug Abuse in the USSR,” in Soviet Social Problems, eds. Anthony Jones, Walter D. Connor, David E. Powell (Boulder, CO: Westview Press, 1991), 94–118.Google Scholar
  5. 50.
    U.S. Department of State, Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, International Narcotics Control Strategy Report,1996 (Washington, D.C.: 1997) notes the establishment of the MVD Main Administration on Illegal Drug Trafficking. See INTERFAX, 17 September 1998, for the announcement of the newly established “experimental police force.”Google Scholar
  6. 67.
    U.S. Department of State, Bureau for International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs, International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, 1998 (Washington, D.C.: 1999).Google Scholar
  7. 69.
    Thomas Jefferson, “Notes on Virginia (1782),” cited in H. L. Mencken, A New Dictionary of Quotations on Historical Principles (New York: Knopf: 1946), 223.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Mark G. Field and Judyth L. Twigg 2000

Authors and Affiliations

  • John M. Kramer

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