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The Algae pp 183-219 | Cite as

Phaeophyta

Phaeophyceae
  • V. J. Chapman
  • D. J. Chapman

Abstract

The algae composing this class range from minute discs to thalli 100 metres or more in length and are characterized by the presence of the carotenoid, fucoxanthin, which masks the chlorophyll. The class can be divided into a number of orders and families which can be treated independently (Fritsch, 1945; Scagel, 1966), or the families may be placed into three groups as proposed by Kylin (1933). These groups are based upon the type of alternation of generations, though the classification involves difficulties so far as the families Cutleriaceae and Tilopteridaceae are concerned and it is therefore best not to use a formal classification. The three groups are:
  1. (a)

    Isogeneratae:

    Plants with two morphologically similar but cytologically different generations in the life cycle (e.g. Ectocarpaceae, Sphacelariaceae, Dictyotaceae).

     
  2. (b)

    Heterogeneratae:

    Plants with two morphologically and cytologically dissimilar generations in the life cycle: (i) Haplostichineae: Plants with branched threads, which are often interwoven, and usually with trichothallic growth (e.g. Chordariaceae, Mesogloiaceae, Elachistaceae, Spermatochnaceae, Sporochnaceae, Desmarestiaceae ). (ii) Polystichineae: Plants built up by intercalary growth into a parenchymatous thallus (e.g. Punctariaceae, Dictyosiphonaceae, Laminariales).

     
  3. (c)

    Cyclosporeae:

    Plants possessing a diploid generation only (e.g. Durvilleales, Ascoseirales, Fucales).

     

Keywords

Apical Cell Female Gamete Stalk Cell Basal Disc Regular Alternation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© D. J. Chapman 1973

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. J. Chapman
    • 1
  • D. J. Chapman
    • 2
  1. 1.University of AucklandNew Zealand
  2. 2.University of ChicagoUSA

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