Scale and Governance in the South Pacific

  • Peter Larmour
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

The smallness of South Pacific states has not reduced demands for decentralization of government. Their median population is about 55 000. The smallest independent state, Tuvalu, has a population of only 9000, but its government faces strong popular pressure to transfer powers, staff and resources from the capital to the outer islands of the archipelago. Populations are typically scattered, and communications poor. At this small scale, some public services, like hospitals, are ‘lumpy’ and indivisible between local governments.

Keywords

Nickel Migration Expense Lution Fishing 

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Copyright information

© Mark Turner 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter Larmour

There are no affiliations available

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