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Decentralization in Papua New Guinea: Two Steps Forward, One Step Back

  • R. J. May
Chapter
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

Local governments were established in Papua New Guinea during the colonial period. By the time of independence in 1975, a new tier of subnational bodies, area authorities, had been created to provide some coordination of local government activities at the administrative district level.1 Following independence, a system of provincial government was introduced, within a unitary constitution. In each of the former administrative districts, renamed provinces, an elected provincial assembly was established, and substantial powers were transferred to the provincial governments, though the national government maintained overriding authority.

Keywords

National Government Provincial Government National Parliament Area Authority Community Government 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mark Turner 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. J. May

There are no affiliations available

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