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Philippines: From Centralism to Localism

  • Mark Turner
Chapter
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

The Philippines is remarkable within South-East Asia for initiating a programme of radical decentralization. Other centralized regimes in the region have indicated their desire to decentralize, but their actions have fallen far short of the scope of recent Philippine reforms. The impetus for the Philippine experiment is derived from the ‘people power’ experience, which contributed to the ousting of President Marcos, and a deep-seated commitment to democratic politics. It can even be portrayed as a rediscovery of a decentralized past interrupted by more than three centuries of colonial centralization, a belief in whose efficacy was initially absorbed into the psyche of the independent republic.

Keywords

Local Government Chief Executive Local Official Local Governance Local Autonomy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Mark Turner 1999

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  • Mark Turner

There are no affiliations available

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