World Fiction: the Transformation of the English/Western Literature Canon

  • Marion Frank-Wilson

Abstract

Within the last decade, the established canon of European and Western literatures has undergone a dramatic change with the emergence of a world fiction or transcultural literature that has transformed the traditionally Eurocentric western canon. This phenomenon can be seen in connection with the cultural, political and economical developments prior to and following the collapse of communism.

Keywords

Migration Europe Transportation Malaysia Paral 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Marion Frank-Wilson

There are no affiliations available

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