Rethinking the ‘New Regionalism’ in the Context of Globalization

  • James H. Mittelman
Part of the The New Regionalism book series (NERE)

Abstract

Following its decline in theory and practice in the 1970s, regionalism both revived and changed dramatically in the 1980s, and has gained strength in the 1990s. Regionalism today is emerging as a potent force in the global restructuring of power and production.

Keywords

Europe Income Diesel Explosive Assimilation 

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Copyright information

© The United Nations University/World Institute for Development Economics Research, Katajanokanlaituri 6B, 00160 Helsinki, Finland 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • James H. Mittelman
    • 1
  1. 1.School of International ServiceAmerican UniversityWashington, DCUSA

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