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Landscape History and Landscape Heritage

  • Richard Muir
Chapter

Abstract

The spectrum of approaches to the study of landscape is remarkably broad. Some approaches, like geomorphology and the aesthetic approaches to landscape, differ from each other greatly. There are others — such as historical geography and landscape history or landscape history and landscape archaeology — which are only separated by nuances of emphasis and the relative importances accorded to different perspectives and techniques of study. Scholarly interest in landscape origins existed long before the arrival of people who regarded themselves as being landscape historians. This is scarcely surprising, for so long as thoughtful humans have occupied and explored the settings of their existence they must have puzzled over the formation and evolution of countryside and its facets.

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© Richard Muir 1999

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  • Richard Muir

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