A Survey of Russia’s Culture and Media Wars

  • Frank Ellis

Abstract

The writer’s special role in Russian society is well documented and needs no further explanation. As a vehicle of political and intellectual protest, literature has shaped Russian society, or been intimately involved with its fate, in a way that is quite unusual, even unique, when compared to Western societies. Russian writers took it upon themselves to champion various social and intellectual causes, which after 1917, and especially 1934, though receiving the ideological sanction of the party, had the range of themes severely circumscribed.

Keywords

Europe Nash Volatility Boris Dick 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Hedrick Smith, The New Russians, Hutchinson, London, 1990, p. 402.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business, Heinemann, London, 1986, p. 84.Google Scholar
  3. 5.
    In his essay ‘Psychological Culture’, Alexander Etkind, notes: The only way for a patient to get out of the psychiatric prison was to renounce incorrect views and embrace the official line. Again, the healthy psyche was equated with discursiveness, the ability to spout correct verbiage, the eagerness with which one was willing to present ideologically correct precepts as personal convictions.’ See Russian Culture at the Crossroads: Paradoxes of Postcommunist Consciousness, Dmitri N. Shalin (ed.), Westview Press, Colorado and Oxford, 1996, p. 121.Google Scholar
  4. 8.
    George Orwell, ‘The Prevention of Literature’, Inside the Whale and Other Essays, Penguin, Harmondsworth, Middlesex, 1983, p. 173.Google Scholar
  5. 10.
    Neil Postman, Amusing Ourselves to Death: Public Discourse in the Age of Show Business, Heinemann, London, 1986, p. 141.Google Scholar
  6. 11.
    Czesław Miłbsz, The Captive Mind, trans. Jane Zielonko, Penguin, Harmondsworth, 1985, p. xiv.Google Scholar
  7. 16.
    Quoted in Tax Choldin, The Red Pencil, 1989, p. 93.Google Scholar
  8. 17.
    Dmitri N. Shalin (ed.), Russian Culture at the Crossroads: Paradoxes of Postcommunist Consciousness, Westview Press, Colorado and Oxford, 1996, p. 33.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Frank Ellis 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • Frank Ellis
    • 1
  1. 1.University of LeedsUK

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