The Media and Religion in Third World Politics

  • Vicky Randall

Abstract

Confident expectations of modernization theorists and Marxists alike that Third World societies and politics would become increasingly secular now appear at the least premature. The continuing, even growing, salience of religion in Third World politics is now widely recognized and reflected in an expanding literature (for an overview, see Haynes, 1993). Explanations offered tend to be partial, fragmentary and come from different perspectives. But in many accounts a strong link is suggested between the political salience of religion and the expansion, national and international, of the communications media.

Keywords

Crystallization Europe Syria Assure Lution 

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1999

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  • Vicky Randall

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