Advertisement

Scholars and Democratic Politics in Nigeria

  • Björn Beckman
  • Attahiru M. Jega
Chapter
  • 37 Downloads
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

The chapter reports on current joint work on the role of organized interests in Nigerian democratization (Beckman and Jega, 1994). The wider study seeks to develop a general argument about the connections between the pursuit of group self-interest, the defence of organizational rights and involvement in wider democratic struggles. The argument draws on the experiences of a range of Nigerian organizations during the 1980s and early 1990s, including the central labour body, the Nigeria Labour Congress (NLC), one major industrial union (the textile workers’), the Nigerian Bar Association (NBA), the Nigerian Union of Journalists (NUJ), one women’s organization, Women in Nigeria (WIN), and some civic and human rights groups. In this chapter two organizations are used to illustrate the argument, the Academic Staff Union of the Universities (ASUU) and the National Association of Nigerian Students (NANS), the organizations of the ‘scholars’. Much of the chapter, however, deals with the general issues.

Keywords

Interest Group Structural Adjustment National Politics Democratic Politics Organize Interest 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

REFERENCES

  1. Akwetey, E. O. (1994) Trade Unions and Democratisation. A Comparative Study of Zambia and Ghana. Stockholm: Department of Political Science.Google Scholar
  2. Andrae, G. and Beckman, B. (1991) ‘Textile unions and industrial crisis in Nigeria: labour structure, organization, and strategies’, in I. Brandell (ed.), Workers in Third World Industrialization. London: Macmillan.Google Scholar
  3. Andrae, G. (1992) Labour Regimes and Adjustment in the Nigerian Textile Industry. Paper to Workshop on ‘The State, Structural Adjustment and Changing Social and Political Relations in Africa’. Uppsala: Scandinavian Institute of African Studies.Google Scholar
  4. ASUU (1984) How to Save Nigeria. Ibadan.Google Scholar
  5. ASUU (1986) The Killings at A. B. U. Friday 23 May 1986 Zaria: ABU ASUU Branch.Google Scholar
  6. ASUU (1987) ASUU and the 1986 Education Crisis in Nigeria. Ibadan.Google Scholar
  7. ASUU (1993) Nigeria: The Way Forward. Ibadan.Google Scholar
  8. ASW (1994) Communiqué at the end of the National Conference on ‘The State of the Nation’. 5–7 April.Google Scholar
  9. Babatope, E. (1991) Student Power in Nigeria (1956–1980). Lagos/Mushin: Kola Okanlawon Services Ltd.Google Scholar
  10. Bagu, C. et al. (1994) Why we withdrew from the CD Convention. Press statement by the ex-national officers of the Campaign for Democracy, signed Chom Bagu, Chima Ubani, Glory Kilanko et al.Google Scholar
  11. Bangura, Y. (1993) Intellectuals, Economic Reform and Social Change: Constraints and Opportunities in the Formation of a Nigerian Technocracy. Paper to International Symposium on Hidden Actors of Development: Intellectuals, Technocrats and Social Change in the Third World. Leiden: Institute of Cultural and Social Studies. Development and Change (forthcoming).Google Scholar
  12. Beckman, B. (1990) ‘Structural adjustment and democracy. Interest group resistance to structural adjustment and the development of the democracy movement in Africa.’ Research proposal. Stockholm University: Department of Political Science.Google Scholar
  13. Beckman, B. (1992a) ‘Empowerment or repression? The World Bank and the politics of adjustment’, in P. Gibbon, Y. Bangura and A. Ofstad (eds), Authoritarianism, Democracy and Adjustment. The Politics of Economic Reform in Africa. Uppsala: Scandinavian Institute of African Studies.Google Scholar
  14. Beckman, B. (1992b) The Politics of Labour and Adjustment: The Experience of the Nigeria Labour Congress. Paper to Conference on ‘The Politics of Adjustment’, Codesria, Dakar.Google Scholar
  15. Beckman, B. (1993a) ‘The liberation of civil society: neo-liberal ideology and political theory’, Review of African Political Economy, vol. 58.Google Scholar
  16. Beckman, B. (1993b) Interest Groups and the Construction of Democratic Space. Paper to the Conference on the Expansion of Nigerian Democratic Space. Lagos: Nigerian Institute of International Affairs.Google Scholar
  17. Beckman, B. and Jega, A. (1994) Organized Interests and Democratization in Nigeria. A Synopsis. University of Stockholm: Department of Political Science.Google Scholar
  18. CD (1991) Campaign for Democracy in Nigeria Text of a press conference announcing the inauguration of the movement, 11 November.Google Scholar
  19. Jega, A. M. (1990) The World Bank and the Universities in Nigeria. Paper to the Conference on ‘The World Bank Loan, the Universities, and the Future of Nigeria’, Ile-Ife: OAU, 21 April.Google Scholar
  20. Jega, A. M. (1993a) ‘Professional associations and structural adjustment’, in A. O. Olukoshi (ed.), The Politics of Structural Adjustment in Nigeria. London: James Currey.Google Scholar
  21. Jega, A. M. (1993b) Intellectuals and Academics in the Struggle for Democracy in Nigeria. Paper to the Conference on the Expansion of Nigerian Democratic Space. Lagos: Nigerian Institute of International Affairs.Google Scholar
  22. Jega, A. M. (1993c) ASUU’s Democratic Agenda. Presentation to the Conference on the Expansion of Nigerian Democratic Space. Lagos: Nigerian Institute of International Affairs.Google Scholar
  23. Jega, A. M. (1994) The Role of Unions in Conflict Management in Our Tertiary Institutions. Paper to Workshop at the Administrative Staff College of Nigeria (ASCON), Badagry.Google Scholar
  24. Mamdani, M. (1990) ‘State and civil society in contemporary Africa: reconceptualizing the birth of state nationalism and the defeat of popular movements’, Africa Development, vol. XV, no. 3/4.Google Scholar
  25. Mamdani, M. (1992) Africa: Democratic Theory and Democratic Strugles. Paper to Workshop on Social Movements, State and Democracy. New Delhi: Indian Statistical Institute.Google Scholar
  26. Otobo, D. (1988) State and Industrial Relations in Nigeria. Lagos: Malthouse Press.Google Scholar
  27. Shettima, K. A. (1993) ‘Structural adjustment and the student movement in Nigeria’, Review of African Political Economy, vol. 56.Google Scholar
  28. Yusuf, A. A. (1991) The State, the StudentsMovement and Democratic Struggles in Nigeria, 1925–1990. MSc dissertation. Zaria: Ahmadu Bello University, Department of Political Science.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1998
Selection and editorial matter © Lars Rudebeck, Olle Törnquist and Virgilio Rojas 1996, 1998 Text © Macmillan Press Ltd 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Björn Beckman
  • Attahiru M. Jega

There are no affiliations available

Personalised recommendations