Of Convents, Congressmen and Plessy v. Ferguson

  • Michel S. Laguerre

Abstract

The earliest diasporic Haitian communities in the United States were established at the beginning of the Haitian revolution of 1791 and remained in existence through the second and third generation, throughout the nineteenth century. These communities provide us with a social laboratory for an interpretive analysis of some aspects of the technology of subjugated local and transnational practices. While the sociology of everyday life with its focus on individual practices provides the analytical tools to bring human agency to the center of our sociological investigations, it is rather Foucault’s1 foray in the realm of ‘subjugated knowledges’, Geertz’s2 emphasis on ‘local knowledge’, and Deleuze and Guattari’s3 view of minority knowledge production as ‘minor literature’ that compel us to unveil the links between the micro-system of everyday practice and resistance and the macro-system of power.

Keywords

Migration Mold Income Hunt Arena 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Michel S. Laguerre 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michel S. Laguerre
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA

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