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Eastern Europe: consequences and response

  • Peter Lawrence
Chapter

Abstract

As suggested already there are variations in the way companies have reacted to post-communism — variations from country to country, and in developments over time — and a contrast between companies that have been privatised and those that are still state-owned (as explored in the case of Bulgaria in the previous chapter). Perhaps the most disputed issue between contemporary researchers concerns the intensity of managerial proactivity. In this connection we have already cited a number of writers who have suggested that, in the companies they have examined in Russia, Poland and the Czech Republic, the managers’ main concern was to preserve their jobs, and to this end they strove to preserve their companies, if necessary influencing or even taking control of the privatisation process. A different emphasis is offered by Edwards and Lawrence (1994) in their discussion of managers in the former GDR in the early 1990s, where managers typically took control and tried to make a success of their companies independently of the prospect of privatisation via the agency of the Treuhand. Similarly Edwards (1997), writing about post-communist Hungary in the mid 1990s, emphasises the quality of managerial proactivity.

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References

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Copyright information

© Peter Lawrence 1998

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  • Peter Lawrence

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