Privatization and the State: Russia, Eastern Europe, East Asia

  • Nigel Harris
  • David Lockwood
Part of the International Political Economy Series book series (IPES)

Abstract

A comparison of the economic transformation of the Soviet Union and East Asia (for the purposes of this chapter, the newly industrialized countries — excluding Hong Kong — China and Vietnam) produces an impression of clear similarity and radical contrast. The aim of transformation seems to have been similar in both sets of cases: the transformation of a militarily inspired, state-run economy into a market-oriented one. The outcomes of the process have been vastly different — an ‘economic miracle’ on the one hand, decline and collapse on the other.

Keywords

Heavy Industry Bank Credit Industrial Output World Market Price Soviet Economy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Nigel Harris
  • David Lockwood

There are no affiliations available

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