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Gothic Horror pp 101-301 | Cite as

Contemporary Critical Accounts

  • Julia Briggs
  • David Punter
  • Tzvetan Todorov
  • Rosemary Jackson
  • Anne Cranny Francis
  • Judie Newman
  • J. Gerald Kennedy
  • Manuel Aguirre
  • Gina Wisker
  • John Nicholson
  • Steve Holland
  • Robert F. Geary
Chapter

Abstract

Montague Rhodes James set out his rules for the ghost story, such as they were, in the various brief prefaces to his collections of tales. Unlike Vernon Lee, he believed it important to establish a setting that was

fairly familiar and the majority of the characters and their talk such as you may meet or hear any day. A ghost story of which the scene is laid in the twelfth or thirteenth century may succeed in being romantic or poetical: it will never put the reader into the position of saying to himself, ‘If I’m not very careful, something of this kind may happen to me!’ (Preface to More Ghost Stories of an Antiquary, 1911).

Keywords

Science Fiction Gender Ideology Serial Killer Woman Writer Horror Story 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Julia Briggs, Night Visitors: The Rise and Fall of the English Ghost Story (London: Faber, 1977).Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    Cited in Edward Wasiolek, Dostoevsky: The Major Fiction (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1964) p. 5.Google Scholar
  3. 7.
    Jonathan Culler, ‘Literary Fantasy’, Cambridge Review, 93 (1973) p. 33.Google Scholar
  4. 13.
    Fredric Jameson, ‘Magical Narratives: Romance as Genre’, New Literary History, 7 (Autumn 1975) p. 146.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. First published in Brian Docherty (ed.), American Horror Fiction (Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1990).Google Scholar
  6. 1.
    Suzy McKee Charnas, The Vampire Tapestry (London: Granada, 1983).Google Scholar
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    For valuable discussions of fantasy literature and the horror genre, and their conventions, see Rosemary Jackson, Fantasy: The Literature of Subversion (London: Methuen, 1981)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    See’ sexual Politics and Political Repression in Bram Stoker’s Dracula’, in Clive Bloom, Brian Docherty, Jane Gibb and Keith Shand (eds), Nineteenth-Century Suspense: From Foe to Conan Doyle (London: Macmillan, 1988).Google Scholar
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    See Peter Penzoldt, The Supernatural in Fiction (London: Peter Nevill, 1952).Google Scholar
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    See Nancy Chodorow, The Reproduction of Mothering (Berkeley, CA: University of California Press, 1978)Google Scholar
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    A motif traced, in Jungian terms, in Jackson’s work by Steven K. Hoffman, in ‘Individuation and Character Development in the Fiction of Shirley Jackson’, Hartford Studies in Literature, 8 (1976) 190–208.Google Scholar
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    Shirley Jackson, The Sundial (New York: Penguin, 1986) p. 109.Google Scholar
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    Mrs Montague’s discoveries recall the worst excesses of the ghost hunter, at Borley Rectory in Essex. See Harry Price, The Most Haunted House in England: Ten Years’ Investigation of Borley Rectory (London: Longmans, Green, 1940)Google Scholar
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    See Peter Underwood, Dictionary of the Occult and Supernatural (London: George G. Harrap, 1978) p. 147.Google Scholar
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  40. First published in Manuel Aguirre, The Closed Space: Horror Fiction and Western Symbolism (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1990).Google Scholar
  41. First published in Clive Bloom (ed.), Creepers (London: Pluto, 1993).Google Scholar
  42. 3.
    Angela Carter in conversation with John Haffenden, The Literary Review, v (1984) p. 37.Google Scholar
  43. First published in Clive Bloom (ed.), Creepers (London: Pluto, 1993).Google Scholar
  44. The primary source of information and quotes for this feature is Martin Barker’s A Haunt of Fears (London: Pluto Press, 1984).Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Limited 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Julia Briggs
  • David Punter
  • Tzvetan Todorov
  • Rosemary Jackson
  • Anne Cranny Francis
  • Judie Newman
  • J. Gerald Kennedy
  • Manuel Aguirre
  • Gina Wisker
  • John Nicholson
  • Steve Holland
  • Robert F. Geary

There are no affiliations available

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