Introduction

  • Yongjin Zhang
  • Rouben Azizian
Part of the St Antony’s Series book series

Abstract

This book brings together twelve research essays by leading Chinese and Russian scholars and explores political, economic, diplomatic and strategic responses of these two continental powers to the emergence of a group of independent states in Central Asia. It intends to provide a rare insight into the Chinese and the Russian perceptions of the evolving Central Asia conundrum.

Keywords

Europe Turkey Resi Editing Boris 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    See Chapters 1 and 4 in this book. For further discussion of debate on Russia’s Central Asian policy, see Zviagelskaia, I. D., The Russian Policy Debate on Central Asia, Royal Institute of International Affairs, London, 1995.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    See in particular, Rashid, Ahmed, The Resurgence of Central Asia: Islam or Nationalism? Oxford University Press, Oxford, 1994;Google Scholar
  3. Naumkin, V., Central Asia and Transcaucasia: Ethnicity and Conflict Greenwood, 1994;Google Scholar
  4. Banuazizi, Ali and Weiner, Myron (eds.), The New Geopolitics of Central Asia and Its Borderlands, I. B. Tauris, London, 1994;Google Scholar
  5. Windrow, Gareth, Turkey in Post-Soviet Central Asia, Royal Institute of International Affairs, London 1994;Google Scholar
  6. Ehteshami, A., From the Gulf to Central Asia: Players in the New Great Game, University of Exeter Press, 1994;Google Scholar
  7. Haghayeghi, Mehrdad, Islam and Politics in Central Asia, Macmillan, Basingstoke, 1995,Google Scholar
  8. and Dannreuther, R., Creating New States in Central Asia: The Strategic Implications of the Collapse of Soviet Power in Central Asia, Adelphi Paper, No. 288, Brassey’s (UK) Ltd., London, 1994.Google Scholar
  9. 3.
    The only exception is, perhaps, The New Central Asia and Its Neighbours, edited by Peter Ferdinand. There is a brief chapter on China contributed by Peter Ferdinand himself. See Ferdinand P. (ed.), The New Central Asia and Its Neighbours, Pinter, London, 1994; pp. 95–107 ‘The New Central Asia and China’.Google Scholar
  10. 4.
    See Malik, Hafeez (ed.), Central Asia: Its Strategic Importance and Future Prospects, Macmillan, Basingstoke, 1994; and Banuazizi, Ali and Weiner, Myron (eds), The New Geopolitics of Central Asia and Its Borderlands, pp. 233–72.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yongjin Zhang
  • Rouben Azizian

There are no affiliations available

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