Neo-Conservatism in the Shadow of Neo-Liberalism

  • Pekka Suvanto

Abstract

Many people regard Karl R. Popper’s The Open Society and its Enemies (1944) as one of the most important pieces of wartime ideological stocktaking. Isaiah Berlin described it as containing the most devastating criticism of Marxist philosophical and historical doctrines by any living author.1 It was a powerful attack on ‘historicism’, i.e. on Hegel’s and Marx’s way of viewing history as law-governed development leading to the perfection of human existence. In his critique Popper argues that Hegel arrived at a surprisingly conservative conclusion, replacing conscience with blind submission, and brotherhood with totalitarian nationalism.2

Keywords

Europe Income Sewage Expense Sine 

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Copyright information

© Pekka Suvanto 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pekka Suvanto
    • 1
  1. 1.Finland

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