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The Economic Dimension

  • B. Vivekanandan

Abstract

The economic dimension of the internationalism of the Social Democrats of Europe had its origins in their struggle to ensure the end of exploitation and to promote distributive justice on a global plane through solidarity. The focus of the Socialist parties in the beginning was trained largely on the economic problems of the working class both nationally and internationally. In the General Statutes of the International Working Men’s Association (First Socialist International) Karl Marx stated that the ‘economic emancipation of the working class’ was ‘the greatest end to which every political movement ought to be subordinate as a means’.1 He envisaged the Socialist International as a ‘centre of relations and planned cooperation between the workers associations in different lands’, and as such an instrument of transnational solidarity among the Socialist parties all over the world.

Keywords

International Monetary Fund Trade Union Debt Crisis Economic Dimension Transnational Corporation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© B. Vivekanandan 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Vivekanandan
    • 1
  1. 1.School of International StudiesJawaharlal Nehru UniversityNew DelhiIndia

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