Politics, Education, and Paradigmatic Reconceptualism: US Critical Theory in the 1990s

  • Russell F. Farnen

Abstract

Within the general context of the US educational ‘system’, this contribution answers three questions: What are some recent and significant trends in critical social science or radical educational theory on social structure, culture, and individual or group behavior? Do these trends (such as ethnographic research and everyday politics) coincide with any current US developments in political science, socialization, and education? Is there any prospect that critical educational studies will have a significant impact on curriculum, research, or theoretical formulations in American political science, education, and/or socialization? We discuss such trends and draw relevant conclusions. In this chapter, ‘critical’ educational theory refers to a diverse group of radical democratic, New Left, neo-Marxist, and reconceptualist critics of both classic and social ‘liberal’ and ‘neoconservative’ concepts of schooling (that is, opposed to those espousing what Tomas Englund (chapter 15) describes as their ‘patriarchal’ and ‘scientific/rational’ discourses on education).

Keywords

Income Expense Resis Posit Arena 

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