The Impact of Economics in the New Asia-Pacific Region

  • Stuart Harris

Abstract

In 1845, the British government repealed the Corn Laws. The 150th anniversary of that event was celebrated last year by those who see the benefits of liberalised international trade to global welfare as having emerged very significantly from that event. It was also significant for Australia because it was the start of Britain’s economic interdependence with Australia, among other producers of agricultural commodities.

Keywords

Corn Fishing Arena Malaysia Defend 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stuart Harris

There are no affiliations available

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