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Crown Culture and Counter-Culture

  • Murray G. H. Pittock
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Part of the British Studies Series book series (BRSS)

Abstract

Although the increase in capital crimes in pursuit of the protection of property arguably had a bark worse than its bite (for example, in the 1590s as many had been executed in one year in Essex as in the whole of the Home Counties in the mid-eighteenth century), there was still a marked shift of legal focus in tandem with the ideological centrality of property in political and, given the effect on the living standards of the clergy, religious, culture. Although the property rights proclaimed and defended by the British Government after 1714 were vulnerable and of doubtful legitimacy, the defensiveness of the Whig ascendancy over the next 46 years was almost certainly a political mistake. Sir Robert Walpole in particular, throughout more than 20 years in power, played up the Jacobite theme to encourage Whig solidarity and paranoia. As a result, it has been argued that the Tories were driven, through exclusion, to be a Jacobite party.

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Murray G. H. Pittock 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Murray G. H. Pittock
    • 1
  1. 1.EdinburghUK

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