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Socialisation and Social Vitality: A Psychocultural Perspective

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Abstract

Most observers of Japan would agree that Japanese society is characterised by a high level of social vitality. Since such assessments are usually based on economic considerations, they are dominated by images of a country with a highly efficient industrial system that exports vast quantities of quality goods abroad and accumulates tremendous wealth at home. Social vitality in Japan is thus most frequently measured by economic indicators such as GNP, industrial productivity, trade surplus, stock market performance, unemployment, economic growth, etc. Despite the ‘objectivity’ of these criteria, such narrow economic accounts of Japanese social vitality seem inadequate, especially for holistically minded anthropologists who traditionally address social issues from a comprehensive multi-dimensional perspective which examines not only economic factors but also cultural, institutional, educational, interactional and psychological indices of social interaction and social continuity.

Keywords

Japanese Society Social Role Cultural Norm Social Cohesion Social Order 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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