Neither Adversaries Nor Partners: Russia and the West Search for a New Relationship

  • Paul J. Marantz

Abstract

In December 1991, a new Russian state emerged from the wreckage of the Soviet Union. At first, there was much optimism in both Russia and the West that the collapse of Soviet power, the demise of Marxist-Leninist ideology, and the end of the Cold War would lead to a more tranquil world, one in which Moscow would cease being a threatening adversary and would instead become a cooperative member of the international community.1

Keywords

Europe Income Turkey Boulder Defend 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Roger E. Kanet and Alexander V. Kozhemiakin 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul J. Marantz

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