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Worldwide Interdependence in Ecological Matters

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Abstract

It is almost a truism that the world is becoming more interdependent, with economic and financial linkages dominating and leading the trend, while political arrangements appear to be lagging. To a large degree, of course, economic and political developments were stalled for four decades by the Cold War and resultant bipolar orientation of nations. Still, technological development continued mostly unhindered and was ready for global linkage when the bipolar political structure finally broke down. Satellite communications, international corporations, financial links among world markets, and rapid travel have knit disparate societies closer together even as ethnic tensions and ancient feuds have ironically erupted into conflict within and between some nations. Never have humanity’s myriad societies seemed at once more interconnected and more fractured.’

Keywords

Land Degradation Family Planning Programme Maximum Sustainable Yield World Resource Institute World Citizenship 
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© Pugwash Conferences on Science and World Affairs 1997

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