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Teaching Enterprise Culture: Individualism, Vocationalism and the New Right

  • Phil Cohen
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Abstract

Perhaps the most enduring legacy of the Thatcher years is the reshaping of the educational system. This is not just a matter of the great structural reforms — the introduction of the National Curriculum, the local management of schools, the creation of a new system of post-school vocational training; it concerns the way in which the New Right vision of Enterprise Culture has come to be widely accepted as defining the skills and values to which all children and young people should aspire. Few educationalists and politicians now question this ‘commonsense’ philosophy even if they may disagree about how its goals can best be achieved.

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© Phil Cohen 1997

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  • Phil Cohen

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