The Far East Ménage à Trois: Geoeconomic and Geopolitical Relations among Japan, China, and the United States

  • William R. Nester

Abstract

The power relations among any three states with overlapping interests are complex, rarely balanced, and often unstable. Tension can pervade such a relationship because in conflicts there is always the possibility that two may gang up on the other. The dynamic of a strategic triangle, whether it be geoeconomic or geopolitical, revolves around how the ‘security of each state is significantly shaped by the nature of the relationship between the other two.’1

Keywords

Ozone Income Radar Malaysia Dispatch 

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Notes

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Copyright information

© Hafeez Malik 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • William R. Nester

There are no affiliations available

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