The Development of Price-Mars’ Political, Educational, and Religious Theories, 1919–29

  • Magdaline W. Shannon

Abstract

Haitian discontent with the Occupation continued during the decade from 1919 to 1929. The period was also one of concern on the part of American Friends of Haiti with the activities and direction of the Occupation authorities during successive US presidential administrations. Within this context, Price-Mars endeavored to rejuvenate Haitian political and cultural pride and stamina through a series of trenchant intellectual initiatives, which would enable its leaders to deal more effectively with the constantly fluctuating political scene.

Keywords

Mercury Europe Rubber Posit Tate 

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Notes

  1. 9.
    John W. Blassingame, “The Press and American Intervention in Haiti and the Dominican Republic, 1904–1920,” Caribbean Studies, 9, No. 2 (1969), 27–43; Dana G. Munro, The United States and the Caribbean Republics, 1921–1933 (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1974), pp. 4–6; Samuel Guy Inman, “Hard Problems in Haiti,” and “The American Occupation of Haiti,” Current History, 13, I (1920), 338–48.Google Scholar
  2. 23.
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  3. 35.
    Thomas Lechaud, “Têtes,” La Relève, I, No. 1, (1932), 7–8; Antoine, pp. 123, 126; Robert P. Parsons, “History of Haitian Medicine,” Annals of Medical History, NS I (1929), 291–324.Google Scholar
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    Jean Price-Mars, De Saint-Domingue à Haiti (Paris: Présence Africaine, 1959), pp. 43–4.Google Scholar
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© Magdaline W. Shannon 1996

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  • Magdaline W. Shannon

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