The Cabinet and the Executive Office of the President

  • Anthony J. Bennett

Abstract

‘The president needs help’, stated the Brownlow Report of 1937. As a result of this report, the Executive Office of the President (EOP) was born. The EOP was to provide the president with a ‘general staff to help him in directing the far-flung activities of the federal executive. Its function was to be administrative, not substantive. It was to be a catalyst in the decision-making process, not part of that process. The EOP is made up of a number of offices which work within the White House. Chief among these is the White House Staff which contains the president’s closest aides and most senior advisers, as well as people like the press secretary and the appointments secretary.

Keywords

Transportation Assure Folk Dick Timothy 

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8 The Cabinet and the Executive Office of the President

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Copyright information

© Anthony J. Bennett 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony J. Bennett
    • 1
  1. 1.Charterhouse, SurreyUK

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