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The United Kingdom: constitutional pragmatism and the adoption of the referendum

  • Denis Balsom

Abstract

Britain, almost uniquely amongst mature democracies, does not have a written constitution. Constitutional practice is uncodified and evolves by precedent and convention. Formally, absolute sovereignty remains with the Crown in parliament and although this constitutional myth remains intact, it is wearing increasingly thin in the era of an enlarged European Union. It follows therefore that referendums can have no formal status under the British constitution, but even so their usage is not proscribed, and their occasional usage in the future appears probable.

Keywords

European Economic Community Labour Party Maastricht Treaty Issue Position Constitutional Reform 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Denis Balsom

There are no affiliations available

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