Knowledge, Belief and Religion

  • Tony Bilton
  • Kevin Bonnett
  • Pip Jones
  • David Skinner
  • Michelle Stanworth
  • Andrew Webster
Chapter

Abstract

This chapter examines one of the major debates concerning the emergence of modern social life: does the rise of rationalism, represented by scientific thinking and practices, mean that modern human beings have access to a form of cognition, and consequently, a kind of knowledge, which is markedly superior to any other kind?

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Copyright information

© Tony Bilton, Kevin Bonnett, Pip Jones, David Skinner, Michelle Stanworth, Andrew Webster 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony Bilton
    • 1
  • Kevin Bonnett
    • 1
  • Pip Jones
    • 1
  • David Skinner
    • 1
  • Michelle Stanworth
    • 1
  • Andrew Webster
    • 1
  1. 1.Anglia Polytechnic UniversityCambridgeUK

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