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South Africa

  • John D. Brewer
  • Adrian Guelke
  • Ian Hume
  • Edward Moxon-Browne
  • Rick Wilford

Abstract

The South African state was founded in 1910. Since 1948 it has been under the control of the Afrikaans dominated National Party, which has pursued the policy of racial segregation and inequality we know as ‘apartheid’. More recently, however, the South African state seems to be changing its form and practice. It is possible to compile an entensive catalogue of changes which have abolished some of the worst features of apartheid and extended new rights to Black South Africans.1 It is moving away from a position Hanf once called ‘uni-lateral conflict regulation’ (where the interests of one group in society dominate over those of other groups), toward a position where the consent and co-operation of subordinate groups is more important in decision-making.2 Speeches by government ministers are replete with references to the mistakes made in the past and how, in the new era of realism, the needs and interests of Black South Africans cannot be ignored. But most commentators are agreed that while the South African state is encouraging deracialisation in the economy and social life, it is resistant to full and genuine political deracialisation.3 The state seems to be attempting to change apartheid without destroying White political supremacy. Hence the frequent reference by commentators to the gap between the appearance and reality of change in modern South Africa.

Keywords

Police Officer Public Order National Party Conservative Party Traffic Police 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 2.
    See T. Hanf, H. Weiland and G. Vierdag, South Africa: The Prospects of Peaceful Change (London: Rex Collings, 1981) p. 17.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    For example see from different perspectives: H. Adam and H. Giliomee, Ethnic Power Mobilised: Can South Africa Change? (New Haven: Yale University Press, 1979)Google Scholar
  3. S. Nolutshungu, Changing South Africa (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1982)Google Scholar
  4. J. Saul and S. Gelb, The Crisis in South Africa (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1981).Google Scholar
  5. 4.
    For a discussion of social liberty see L. Crocker, Positive Liberty (The Hague: Martinus Nijhoff, 1980). As examples, see on trade union rights C. Hill, Change in South Africa (London: Rex Collings, 1983); and on the constitution see D. Welsh, ‘Constitutional Change in South Africa’, African Affairs, 83 (1984).CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. 10.
    See A. Turk, ‘The Meaning of Criminality in South Africa’, International Journal of the Sociology of Law, 9 (1981) 140.Google Scholar
  7. 12.
    Taken from M. Morris, Armed Conflict in Southern Africa (Cape Town: Spence, 1974) p. 289.Google Scholar
  8. 16.
    H. Adam and K. Moodley, South Africa Without Apartheid (Berkeley: University of California Press, 1986) p. 109.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John D. Brewer, Adrian Guelke, Ian Hume, Edward Moxon-Browne and Rick Wilford 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John D. Brewer
    • 1
  • Adrian Guelke
    • 1
  • Ian Hume
    • 2
  • Edward Moxon-Browne
    • 3
  • Rick Wilford
    • 1
  1. 1.The Queen’s University of BelfastUK
  2. 2.WalesUK
  3. 3.University of LimerickIreland

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