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Ethnography, Ethnicity and Work: Unpacking the West Midlands Clothing Industry

  • Monder Ram
Part of the Explorations in Sociology book series (EIS)

Abstract

Workplace studies in the ethnographic tradition occupy an unusual position within the broad area of industrial relations sociology. Although they resulted in some ‘classic’ contributions, notably Dalton (1959), Gouldner (1954) and Roy (1954), the studies themselves have not formed the basis of mainstream research practice. The ethnographic method is far from common as a means of investigating workplace relations (Edwards 1992). This paper is based on an initial survey but, more centrally, on intensive fieldwork in three small clothing firms over a year long period. It explores particular methodological issues arising from a workplace-based study in the ethnic minority-dominated West Midlands clothing sector (Ram 1994), and argues that to explain adequately the negotiation of order in such a context, a research approach sensitive to the issues of ethnicity, family and gender is required.

Keywords

Family Business Asian Community Inside Status Clothing Industry Case Study Company 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© E. Stina Lyon and Joan Busfield 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Monder Ram

There are no affiliations available

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