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Introduction

  • Amrita Chhachhi
  • Renée Pittin
Part of the Institute of Social Studies, The Hague book series (ISSTH)

Abstract

The contributors to this volume are part of emerging networks of researchers/activists working on a variety of women’s and labour issues internationally. The linkages between North and South, and the global nature of industrialisation and organising inform the volume in general, and are demonstrated also in individual chapters. The different levels and forms of industrialisation and of organising, and specific linkages through shared networks are reflected in quantitative differences in regional and country representation. Asia, Africa and Latin America are particularly represented.

Keywords

Labour Force Trade Union Informal Sector Woman Worker Free Trade Zone 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Amrita Chhachhi and Renée Pittin 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Amrita Chhachhi
  • Renée Pittin

There are no affiliations available

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