The Welsh Background

  • John Ackerman

Abstract

One: I am a Welshman; two: I am a drunkard; three: I am a lover of the human race, especially of women.’1 This concise, humorous, and not untruthful account of himself was given by Dylan Thomas to an audience in Rome in 1947. It shows that he was aware of the extent to which his temperament and his imagination were the products of his Welsh environment.

Keywords

Burning Lost Verse Prose Ancient Race 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    Dylan Thomas: quoted by Geoffrey Moore in ‘Dylan Thomas’, Kenyon Review, vol. xvii (Spring 1955), p. 261.Google Scholar
  2. 3.
    Gwyn Jones: ‘Welsh Dylan’, Adelphi, vol. 30, no. 2 (February 1954), p. 115.Google Scholar
  3. 4.
    Karl Shapiro: ‘Dylan Thomas’, Poetry, vol. 87, no. 2 (November 1955), p. 105.Google Scholar
  4. 5.
    Vernon Watkins: comment on a review of J. M. Brinnin: Dylan Thomas in America in Encounter, vol. VI, no. 6 (June 1956), p. 78.Google Scholar
  5. 6.
    Geoffrey Moore: ‘Dylan Thomas’, Kenyon Review, vol. xvii (Spring 1955), pp. 264–5.Google Scholar
  6. 8.
    A. G. Prys-Jones: ‘Death Shall Have No Dominion’, Dock Leaves (Dylan Thomas Memorial Number), vol. 5, no. 13 (Spring 1954), p. 27.Google Scholar
  7. 12.
    Gwyn Jones: ‘Welsh Dylan’, Adelphi, vol. 30, no. 2 (Spring 1954), p. 115.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© John Ackerman 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Ackerman

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