Income Inequalities and Economic Restructuring

  • Stephen J. Bailey
Chapter
Part of the Macmillan Texts in Economics book series (TE)

Abstract

In 1942 Sir William Beveridge recommended that a comprehensive social insurance scheme should be introduced to cover loss of income resulting from loss of earnings caused by unemployment, sickness and retirement.… The social security system must be consistent with the Government’s overall objectives of the economy. The tax burden on future generations should be reduced; incentives for people to take up or remain in work should be improved; and the system should encourage greater indivival responsibility and choice. (Department of Social Security, The Growth of Social Security, London: HMSO, 1993).

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Further reading

  1. Balls, E. and Gregg, G. (1993) Work and Welfare: Tackling the Jobs Deficit, (London: Institute for Public Policy Research).Google Scholar
  2. Clinton D., Yates, M. and Dharminder, K. (1994) Integrating Taxes and Benefits? (London: Institute for Public Policy Research).Google Scholar
  3. Commission on Social Justice (1993) Social Justice in a Changing World (London: Institute for Public Policy Research).Google Scholar
  4. Commission on Social Justice (1993) The Justice Gap London (London: Institute for Public Policy Research).Google Scholar
  5. CSO (1994) Social Trends, no. 24 (London: HMSO).Google Scholar
  6. Dilnot, A. and Low, H. (1994) The Distribution of Wealth in the UK (London: Institute of Fiscal Studies).Google Scholar
  7. DSS (1994) Households Below Average Income: A Statistical Analysis1979–1991/92 (London: HMSO).Google Scholar
  8. Glyn, A. and Miliband, R. (eds) (1994) Paying for Inequality: The Economic Cost of Social Injustice (London: Rivers Oram Press/Institute for Public Policy Research).Google Scholar
  9. Goodman, A. and Webb, S. (1994) For Richer, For Poorer: The Changing Distribution of Income in the United Kingdom 1961–1991 (London: Institute of Fiscal Studies).Google Scholar
  10. Hills, J. (1994) The Future of Welfare: A Guide to the Debate (York: Joseph Rowntree Foundation).Google Scholar
  11. HM Treasury (1972) Proposals for a Tax-Credit System, Cmnd 5116 (London: HMSO).Google Scholar
  12. Johnston, P. and Webb, S. (1993) ‘Explaining the Growth in UK Income Inequality: 1979–1988’, Economic Journal, vol. 103, pp. 429–35.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Phillimore, P., Beattie, A. and Townsend, P. (1994) ‘Widening Inequality of Health in Northern England 1981–91’, British Medical Journal, vol. 308, no. 6937, pp. 1125–8.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. Townsend, P. and Davidson, N. (1992) Inequalities in Health: The Black Report (London: Penguin).Google Scholar
  15. Wilkinson, R. G. (1994) ‘Divided We Fall’, British Medical Journal, vol. 308, no. 6937, pp. 113–14.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Stephen J. Bailey 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Stephen J. Bailey
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsGlasgow Caledonian UniversityUK

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