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Human Capital: The Health and Well-Being of the Population

  • Sheila Smith
  • Joyce Lannert

Abstract

Mongolia’s past emphasis on human capital formation was reflected in the priority given to investment in the health of her people. The health sector accounted for between 7.5 and 8.5 per cent of total government expenditure during the period 1980 to 1990, and for 6.7 per cent of GDP in 1990. During the socialist period, major advances in health care were achieved, particularly in the extension of effective health services to the nomadic population.

Keywords

Health Sector Population Growth Rate Population Policy Crude Birth Rate Human Capital Formation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes

  1. 1.
    See K. Griffin and T. McKinley, Implementing a Human Development Strategy, (London: Macmillan, 1994), pp. 45ff.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
  3. 3.
    See UNICEF, The Situation of Children and Women in Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, December 1993, p. 14.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    See Ministry of Health, Mongolia: Health Sector Review, Ulaanbaatar, July 1993, p. 28.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    See Ministry of Health, op. cit., p. 12.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    UNICEF, Mongolia Annual Report on Country Situation, 1991, Ulaanbaatar.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    UNICEF, Mongolia: Annual Report on Country Situation, 1993, Ulaanbaatar.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Ministry of Health, op. cit., p. 16. See also D. Munhoo, ‘Current Situation of Mongolian Women and their Goals in Near Future’, Paper prepared for the National Seminar on Women’s Issues, 1992, who states that, ‘Rural women and low-income group women accounted for 83 per cent and 73.5 per cent of maternal deaths in 1992’, p. 6.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    See Ministry of Health, op. cit., Ch. 4.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Ministry of Health, op. cit.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Ministry of Health, op. cit., p. 63.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Ibid., p. 63.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    Sara Randall, ‘Issues in the Demography of Mongolian Nomadic Pastoralism’, Nomadic Peoples, 1993, p. 217.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    UNICEF, The Situation of Children and Women in Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, 1993, p. 8.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    UNICEF, Mongolia: Child Nutrition Survey, Ulaanbaatar, 1993, p. 9.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    UNICEF, The Situation of Children and Women in Mongolia, Ulaanbaatar, 1993.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Ibid., p. 23.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    UNICEF, Mongolia: Child Nutrition Survey, op. cit., p. 17.Google Scholar
  19. 19.
  20. 20.
    Ibid., p. 18.Google Scholar
  21. 21.
    UNICEF, The Situation of Children and Women in Mongolia, 1993, Ulaanbaatar, p. 11.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    Ibid., p. 11.Google Scholar
  23. 25.
    Ministry of Health, Mongolia: Health Sector Review, Ulaanbaatar, 1993, p. 45.Google Scholar
  24. 26.
  25. 27.
    Sara Randall, op. cit., p. 225.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Keith Griffin 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sheila Smith
  • Joyce Lannert

There are no affiliations available

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