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Renewing an Industrial Past: British Pakistani Entrepreneurship in Manchester

  • Pnina Werbner
Part of the St Antony’s book series

Abstract

The growing literature on ethnic and immigrant entrepreneurship in Europe and the United States raises important questions regarding the differential mobility of various ethnic groups,1 and the implications of business success for an understanding of certain forms of racism.2 It also raises questions regarding the cultural basis of immigrant business success, starting from a Weberian emphasis on the unique cultural features of a capitalist ‘ethos’ and moving to a critique of this approach which underlines the collective resources that immigrants mobilize, both ethnic and class,3 and their unique placement as immigrants and sojourners.4 Much of this literature stresses the solidaristic dimensions of immigrant entrepreneurship.

Keywords

Small Firm Market Trader Large Wholesaler Institutional Racism Jewish Immigrant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Palgrave Macmillan, a division of Macmillan Publishers Limited  1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Pnina Werbner

There are no affiliations available

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