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Training as a Critical Link between Theory and Practice

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Abstract

The three previous chapters expound a particular theoretical approach to peacekeeping. This approach is based on the application of peacekeeping conceptualized through a contingency model of conflict resolution. It has been demonstrated that the basis for this reconsideration of peacekeeping derives from three main sources. The first is the argument that international conflicts have fundamentally changed, and new approaches are needed to facilitate their resolution. The second is the argument that the UN has partially responded to the new challenges posed by the shift in conflict by first creating the ad hoc technique of peacekeeping and most recently by moving toward multidimensional peacekeeping. Not only has peacekeeping expanded in numbers of operations and in roles performed during those operations but it has become more complex and more explicitly committed to and involved in conflict resolution processes. The third is the examination of the conceptual basis of the third party role of peacekeeping which poses significant challenges to the current practice of peacekeeping at both micro- and macro-levels.

Keywords

Training Objective Culture Shock Cultural Interaction Intercultural Interaction Conflict Control 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

  1. 1.
    This view is supported in the recent reports presented by the Committee of 34 to the Special Political Committee (now the 4th Committee); see UN Docs. A/48/173, 25 May 1993, A/48/403/Add.1, 2 November 1993, A/SPC/46/L.9, 1991, refers to C-34 Report A/46/254, 18 June 1991. A survey of early Committee documents suggests that training was not then an issue. This is hardly surprising considering the much larger problems associated with Cold War politics which effectively sidelined the Committee from 1965 until 1988.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© A. B. Fetherston 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Peace Research CentreThe Australian National UniversityAustralia

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