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Peacekeeping, Peacemaking and Peacebuilding: Definitions and Linkages

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Abstract

Peacekeeping, peacemaking and peacebuilding represent three distinct categories of UN intervention. Examining the links between these three areas of activity (with particular emphasis on peacekeeping and how peacebuilding and peacemaking link with it) provides some indication of: (1) the scope of linkage, (2) significant gaps, and (3) the extent to which conceptualization of the UN’s third party role is needed to provide a framework which could direct and coordinate these UN activities. The following chapter then looks specifically at initiating the development of a conceptual framework for peacekeeping.

Keywords

United Nations Development Programme Conflict Management Conflict Situation Coherent Approach Peace Operation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and References

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Copyright information

© A. B. Fetherston 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Peace Research CentreThe Australian National UniversityAustralia

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