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Case Studies: United Nations Peacekeeping in Cyprus, Namibia and Former Yugoslavia

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Abstract

The three case studies discussed below were selected because they each illustrate a distinct period in the development of peacekeeping from the Cold War period through to the present. Moreover they show the potential of peacekeeping as a means of resolving international conflict, borne out in Namibia, as well as its limitations, seen most clearly in former Yugoslavia.

Keywords

Buffer Zone Security Council Safe Area Political Office Security Council Resolution 
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Notes and References

  1. 1.
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    UN Doc. SCR 186, 4 March 1964.Google Scholar
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    Reasons for the redrawing and redeployment are given in Stegenga, 1969, pp. 97–101, and seemed, at least in part, due to embarrassing breaches of discipline by some UNFICYP troops, who, acting out of sympathy for the Turkish Cypriots, were caught gun-running.Google Scholar
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    Figures from a 1991 census show that Sector East had a population of 200,000, of which 80,000 were Serbs. Sector West had a population of 100,000 of which 40,000 were Serbs. Sector North had a population of 77,000 of which 55,000 were Serbs. Sector South had a population of 117,000 of which 89,000 were Serbs, see, J. Gow and J.D.D. Smith (1992), ‘Peacemaking, peacekeeping: European security and the Yugoslav wars’, London Defence Studies, No. 11, London: Brassey’s/Centre for Defence Studies, p. 73.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© A. B. Fetherston 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Peace Research CentreThe Australian National UniversityAustralia

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