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Crime At Work pp 186-202 | Cite as

Customer and staff perceptions of the role of closed circuit television in retail security

  • Adrian Beck
  • Andrew Willis

Abstract

Closed circuit television (CCTV) is a relative newcomer to the security field. Its introduction on a wide scale required major technological developments in three areas — camera and optical design, including miniaturisation; electromechanical engineering to allow cameras to pan, tilt and zoom; and multi-camera and playback systems permitting sixteen or more camera pictures to be recorded on a single recorder, any one of which can be viewed as a live full-screen display (British Security Industry Association, 1988; 1990). CCTV reflects the refinement and commercial application of all the technology which lies behind the now familiar domestic video and camcorder.

Keywords

Crime Prevention Security Measure Crime Control Security Personnel Security Device 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Macmillan Publishers Limited 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Adrian Beck
  • Andrew Willis

There are no affiliations available

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