Domestic Sources of Foreign Policy

  • Peter R. Baehr

Abstract

Foreign policy is not made in vacuo. It is the result of an influencing process that consists of many external as well as internal factors. This chapter deals with internal factors, in particular parliament and non-governmental organizations.

Keywords

Coherence Defend Dispatch Sonal Indonesia 

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Notes

  1. 1.
    See Donald M. Fraser, ‘Congress’s Role in the Making of International Human Rights Policy’, in Donald P. Kommers and Gilburt D. Loescher (eds.), Human Rights and American Foreign Policy, Notre Dame and London: University of Notre Dame Press, 1979, p. 248.Google Scholar
  2. 4.
    Manfred Nowak and Theresa Swinehart (eds), Human Rights in Developing Countries 1989 Yearbook, Kehl, Strasbourg, Arlington: N.P. Engel, 1989Google Scholar
  3. Bård-Anders Andreassen and Theresa Swinehart (eds), Human Rights in Developing Countries 1990 Yearbook, Kehl, Strasbourg, Arlington: N.P. Engel, 1991Google Scholar
  4. Bård-Anders Andreassen and Theresa Swinehart (eds), Human Rights in Developing Countries 1991 Yearbook, Oslo: Norwegian University Press, 1992Google Scholar
  5. Bård-Anders Andreassen and Theresa Swinehart (eds), Human Rights in Developing Countries 1993 Yearbook, Oslo: Nordic Human Rights Publications, 1993.Google Scholar
  6. 5.
    See Laurie Wiseberg and Harry Scoble, ‘Monitoring Human Rights Violations: The Role of Nongovernmental Organizations’, in Donald P. Kommers and Gilburt D. Loescher (eds), Human Rights and American Foreign Policy, Notre Dame and London: University of Notre Dame Press, 1979, pp. 179–208Google Scholar
  7. Henry J. Steiner, Diverse Partners: Non-Governmental Organizations in the Human Rights Movement, Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard Law School Human Rights Program, 1991; The Role of Non-Governmental Organizations in the Promotion and Protection of Human Rights, Leiden: NJCM Boekerij, 1991.Google Scholar
  8. 6.
    Statute of Amnesty International, as amended by the 20th International Council Meeting, Yokohama, Japan, 31 August-7 September 1991. See also Peter R. Baehr, ‘Amnesty International and its Self-Imposed Limited, Mandate’, Netherlands Quarterly of Human Rights, Vol. 12, no. 1 (1994), pp. 5–21.Google Scholar
  9. 7.
    Amnesty International, International Report 1993, London, 1993.Google Scholar
  10. 8.
    Peter R. Baehr, ‘The General Assembly: Negotiating the Convention on Torture’, in David P. Forsythe (ed.), The United Nations in the World Political Economy: Essays in Honour of Leon Gordenker, London: Macmillan, 1989, p. 47.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Peter R. Baehr 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter R. Baehr
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Leiden University and Utrecht UniversityThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Netherlands Institute of Human RightsThe Netherlands

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